REM sleep can reset your brain after an upsetting event

By Tracey Anne Duncan, 7/18/19

“REM sleep is considered a time when the brain can process emotional memories, and ‘pack them away,” says Alex Dimitriu, a psychiatrist and sleep specialist at Menlo Park Psychiatry and Sleep Medicine in the San Francisco Bay Area. “When everything is working well, we experience unpleasant — and pleasant — situations, and our brains ‘rehearse’ and process these memories through the night. Like the process of therapy, which REM sleep has been compared to, this helps consolidate and safely store these experiences.”

Click HERE for the full article.

Cannabis and Mental Health: Schizophrenia

July 11, 2019, by  Andrew Ward

Dr. Alex Dimitriu is a double board-certified in Psychiatry and Sleep Medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine. In response to this article, Dr. Dimitriu explained what the effects of psychosis are like on a person. “Psychosis is defined as having false beliefs (often called delusions) and seeing or hearing things that are not real (hallucinations). In a psychotic state, people may appear disorganized, confused, paranoid, almost as if they were tripping on something (like LSD, or magic mushrooms).”

Click HERE for the full article from High Times.

Experts Decode These 7 Common Anxiety Dreams

by Elizabeth Yuko, Jul 10, 2019

Our brains do some interesting things while we sleep, and we are designed to often forget the content of our dreams, Dr. Alex Dimitriu, who is double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and the founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, tells SheKnows. So what actually happens in our heads while we sleep? According to Dimitriu, a lot: Memories get sorted and stored, we free up new space to learn, we problem solve and connect known facts to form “revelations” and our entire brain gets a power wash by the glymphatic system, to essentially clean up the busiest organ of the body. 

Click HERE for the full article on SheKnows.

Why Some People Always Remember Their Dreams and Others Forget

June 25, 2019 New — Written by Sarah Fielding

 “Whether they remember or not, all people do dream in their sleep. It is an essential function for the human brain, and also present in most species,” Dr. Alex Dimitriu, double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, tells Healthline. So if everyone dreams, why don’t we all remember them?

Click HERE for the full story on Healthline.

7 Surprisingly Common Sleep Problems That May Be Health Issues

By Jordan Bissell, 6/25/19

People who have trouble sleeping can sometimes obsess about getting a solid night’s sleep. “Some people with insomnia think about sleep as much as 10 times more per day than the average person,” Dr. Alex Dimitriu, MD, double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, tells Bustle. “Obsessing about sleep all day and often all night does make things worse,” he says. Instead of spending so much time and energy trying to force yourself, do your best not to get flustered. If you’ve been in bed for about 20 minutes but can’t drift off, get out of bed and read a peaceful book or meditate, Dimitriu says.

Click HERE for the full story on Bustle.

Do Brain-Boosting Supplements Actually Work Or Are They Total B.S.?

By Locke Hughes, 05/29/2019

It’s important to note that simply taking one or two of these nootropic agents often results in no significant net change, explained Dr. Alex Dimitriu, founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine.

Instead, researchers have found that a concoction of some of the most researched and validated supplements, with overlapping benefits, is a better approach. “The hope is that if you have enough ingredients with overlapping benefits, taken together, they may be more effective than taken individually,” Dimitriu said.

Click HERE for the full article on the HUFFPOST

Constantly Waking Up During the Night? Here’s How to Know If It’s Something More Serious

May 22, 2019 by Colleen Travers

Having a glass of wine before bed can disrupt your sleep (and make you more likely to need to use the bathroom during the night), and even conditions like anxiety and depression can cause you to toss and turn, according to Alex Dimitriu, MD, a double board-certified physician in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine in Menlo Park, CA. The good news is there are some simple solutions that can help you get more sleep.

Click HERE for the full article on POPSUGAR.

Trapped in a Cycle of Late Nights? Here’s How Sleep Doctors Say You Can Get to Bed Sooner

May 9, 2019 by  Caitlin Flynn

Just as light in the mornings can help jumpstart your internal clock, dialing it back can help prepare your body for sleep. “The key is to allow the body an eight-hour window during which sleep is possible,” AlexDimitriu, MD, founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, told POPSUGAR. That means turning off your devices at least eight hours (and ideally more) before your intended wake time, since blue light can disrupt the production of melatonin. “In the absence of such stimulation, people inevitably get sleepy and end up getting more of the sleep they need,” he said.

Click HERE for the full article on POPSUGAR.

8 Unexpected Sleep Habits That Can Commonly Lead To Divorce, According To Experts

By Jordan Bissell, 4/26/19

If you like to crawl into bed early enough to read a few chapters of a book but your partner prefers to stay up late watching TV, you should be extra careful to communicate so that conflicts don’t arise. “Respect each other’s right to sleep,” Alex Dimitriu, MD, double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, tells Bustle. Make sure you’re both being quiet while the other person is snoozing, and try to use any electronics in another room if your partner is still asleep, he says. While your relationship might benefit most if you have sex and then fall asleep together, making sure to respect each other’s sleep can make sure you’re both well-rested, Dr. Dimitriu says.

Click HERE for the full article on Bustle.

I SWITCHED TO A SUNRISE ALARM CLOCK, AND I’M NO LONGER DREADING EARLY WAKE-UP CALLS

By Erin Magner, APRIL 24, 2019

And according to Alex Dimitriu, MD, founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine, sunrise alarm clocks can actually be effective because they tap into the body’s innate biorhythms. “There is some evidence that natural morning light can actually help prepare the body to wake up,” he says. “This make sense, as our circadian system is closely tuned to natural as well as artificial light. Light-based alarm clocks can provide a gentle wake signal, to prepare the body for wakefulness.”

Click HERE for the full article on Well + Good.

Your Guide to Microdosing for Anxiety and Depression

By Kayleigh Roberts, April 19, 2019

Alex Dimitriu, a physician, agrees that LSD and other psychedelics’ impact on the serotonergic system play a role in its effectiveness in treating anxiety and depression, but he also suggests it may be something more than that. “Even SSRIs that people take now don’t just work on one little part of the brain. They work on every part of the brain — almost like a shotgun blast. Somehow, in that process, we hit on a target that helps. The same is true, I think, with LSD,” he says.

Click HERE for the full article from Allure.

A Scientists’ Guide to Better Sleep

Jamie Friedlander, Apr 12, 2019

Create a space you’re happy to spend time in

Room colors should generally be soothing and create a relaxed atmosphere in the bedroom. It should be a comfortable, cozy den, with colors, furniture, bedding, and soft lighting that make the space special for you. You have to love your bedroom.
— Dr. Alex Dimitriu, founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine

Click HERE for the full article on Medium.com.

These Sleep-Inducing Drinks Are Like Zzz’s In a Bottle

By Molly Longman | Mar 30, 2019

But before you start chugging one nightly, know this: These drinks can help you drift off, but you should switch back to plain water every third night so your body can practice snoozing naturally, suggests Alex Dimitriu, M.D., founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine in California.

“As with all sleep-inducing aids or supplements, I often advise my patients to try taking a night off use to focus on proper sleep hygiene and to ‘learn’ how to sleep without substances as well,” says Dr. Dimitriu.

Click HERE for the full article on SHAPE.

A Patient’s Guide to Pregnancy Insomnia

By Elaine K. Howley, March 29, 2019

Insomnia is the state of not being able to sleep or having inadequate or poor quality of sleep. Dr. Alex Dimitriu, a sleep medicine specialist who’s double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine in California, says insomnia occurs in about 20 to 30 percent of all people.

Click HERE for the full article on US News & World Report.

Fatal Familial Insomnia: Signs, Symptoms, Treatments

By Elaine K. Howley, Contributor March 27, 2019

Dr. Alex Dimitriu, a sleep medicine specialist who’s double board-certified in psychiatry and sleep medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine in California, says that “people with fatal familial insomnia develop this inability to sleep. This goes on for a couple of months and ends in death.”

Click HERE for the full article from US News & World Report.